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In the Gallery
 

Public Programs

Past Events

Artist Talk with Meghann O'Brien
Thursday March, 6, 2014 at 2:30pm
Program included with admission

Meghann O'Brien will be speaking about her journey from being an athlete to becoming a professional artist. Moving though the traditional forms and style of Northwest Coast weaving practices, she shares her process of discovery and transformation.
Visit Meghann's website

About the Exhibition
Sky Blanket features the work of Haida-Kwakwaka'wakw-Irish textile artist, Meghann O'Brien as she explores the emergence of the human spirit face in Raven's Tail textiles, evoking memory and place of objects in constructing the past, present, and future. Inspired by her ancestors' works, ideas about gifts from the spirit world and lineage, and the mountainous landscape of sky and snow, she reveals the intimate experience of her inner and outer worlds.

Sky Blanket is curated by Dr. Martine Reid and sponsored by the Scriba Art Society.

Sky Blanket
Meghann O'Brien: Sky Blanket, 2014. Digital Design: Andy Everson

Sky Blanket runs March 5th to April 6th, 2014



Program Cancelled
Drawing Nudes
Saturday, February 22, 3:00pm
With instruction by artist Dionne Paul
$25.00 (includes tax)
Must bring your own supplies
Contact info [@] billreidgallery.ca or call 604.682.3455 ext. 223 to reserve your spot

Nude Drawing Graphic

Dionne Paul will be your guide as you sketch a nude figure draped in her work Underneath It All; part of the featured exhibition RezErect: Native Erotica.

About Dionne Paul
Dionne Paul (Ximiq) is currently working on her Masters Degree at Emily Carr University. She is a Coast Salish and Northwest Coast artist from the Nuxalk Nation and Sechelt Nation. Visit Dionne's website

About the Exhibition
RezErect: Native Erotica presents a fresh, playful, provocative insight into sensuality and sexuality, featuring works by 28 mid-career and internationally recognized First Nations artists from the Northwest Coast and central Canada. Works range from traditional to contemporary in style, and media include: wood, glass, stone, jewelry, pop art, street art and textiles.

An exhibition guide is also available for sale at the Bill Reid Gallery Gift Shop.



Sunday Storytelling
Spice up your Sundays with an afternoon of sexy storytelling at the Gallery.
Program included with admission

Sunday, January 26, 2:00pm
Dr. Woodrow F. Morrison, BA, JD., Haida
Dr. Woodrow F. Morrison
Dr. Woodrow F. Morrison

About Dr. Woodrow F. Morrison
Woodrow (Woody) is President of the Vancouver Society of Storytelling, and is the Storyteller for Indigenous Roots Art Mentoring Program in Vancouver. For 10 years he was guest Storyteller with the California Indian Storytelling annual Festival, and he is Past President and former Board Member of Full Circle Productions.
After attending Film Production School at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Woody was a Cultural/Story Consultant on 20 Hollywood film productions, including: "The X-Files", "White Fang 2", "Free Willie 2", "Deadman’s Gun".



Sho Sho Esquiro Sho at the Bill Reid Gallery
Thursday, December 5th, 5:30pm
Admission by donation.

Sho Sho Esquiro

Fashion designer ShoSho Esquiro will present her 2014 Collection, which she debuted at the New York Couture Fashion Week earlier this year. She will also debut works that have never been seen before.
Visit her website

To complement ShoSho’s fashions, artists Corrine Hunt and Morgan Green will present selected works of jewelry, just in time for the holiday season.

This event is presented as part of our featured exhibition, RezErect: Native Erotica.



Sunday Storytelling
Spice up your Sundays with an afternoon of sexy storytelling at the Gallery.
Program included with admission

Sunday, November 24, 2:00pm
Latash – Maurice Nahanee Coast Salish cultural practitioner
Maurice Nahanee
Maurice Nahanee

About Maurice Nahanee
Latash – Maurice Nahanee has worked as a professional artist for the past 20 years. His inspiration for visual art came first from his mother and father, the late Lorne and Eva Nahanee, and his Uncle David Nahanee. They were artists and entrepreneurs.



The Pornification of Society Panel Discussion
Wednesday, November 20th 5:00 – 7:30pm
Admission by donation
Panel includes:
  • Alida Kinne Starr, artist featured in RezEret: Native Erotica
  • Dr. Dory Nason, Assistant Professor First Nations Studies and English (UBC)
  • June Scudeler, Metis Phd candidate (UBC)
  • Elise Chenier, Assoc. Professor, Dir., Archive of Lesbian Oral Testimony Office (SFU)
  • Saylesh Wesly, PhD candidate (SFU)
  • Followed by Q & A. Light refreshments.



    Sunday Storytelling
    Spice up your Sundays with an afternoon of sexy storytelling at the Gallery.
    Program included with admission

    Sunday, November 17, 2:00pm
    Beau Dick, Kwakwaka'wakw artist
    Beau Dick
    Beau Dick

    About Beau Dick
    Beau is a respected Kwakwaka’wakw chief and one of the most accomplished and talented traditional carvers and artists on the West Coast. Actively engaged in all aspects of Kwakwaka’wakw culture, he is highly regarded as a teacher and mentor.



    Artist Talk: Lyle Wilson’s Lost Essay in the British Museum

    Saturday, September 14, 2:00pm
    Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art
    639 Hornby Street, Vancouver
    Talk included with admission
    Tsimshian Cosmos
    Lyle Wilson: Tsimshian Cosmos, 1996. Collection of the UBC Museum of Anthropology. Photo: Bill McLennan.

    Don’t miss Haisla artist Lyle Wilson in this final program of his solo exhibition at the Bill Reid Gallery. Lyle, one of the foremost artists working today, will show some of the most interesting, and beautiful examples of Pacific Northwest Coast art in the collection of the British Museum and talk about the evolution of Pacific Northwest Coast painting and design.

    About Lyle Wilson
    Born and raised in the Haisla community of Kitamaat, British Columbia, Lyle Wilson studied fine arts and education at both the University of British Columbia and the Emily Carr College of Art and Design. He also undertook an intensive exploration of what he refers to as "the classic Northwest Coast style" while working as a commissioned artist at the Museum of Anthropology at UBC (MOA). The artist’s 20-year association with MOA enabled him to study the work of past masters and develop his own understanding and interpretation of the style of painting popularly known as formline.

    About the Exhibition
    The first major exhibition of paintings by Vancouver-based Haisla artist, Lyle Wilson, revealing his evolving artistic vision and celebrating his accomplishments as a painter. Created over a period of 20 years, this collection of 58 works shows remarkable detail in execution, and reflects narrative themes and personal stories.

    Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson runs through September 15, 2013.

    The presentation of Paint in this Gallery would not have been possible without the generous support of the Deux Mille Foundation, The Mary and Gordon Christopher Family Foundation, Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, and The Listel Hotel.

    We also gratefully acknowledge the support of the following organizations for their respective contributions to the creation of this exhibition and accompanying catalogue: Maple Ridge Pitt Meadows Arts Council, Canada Council for the Arts, The Haisla Nation Council (HNC), Michael O’Brian Family Foundation and the Audain Foundation for the Visual Arts.

    An exhibition catalogue is also available for sale at the Bill Reid Gallery Gift Shop. It offers a comprehensive visual record of the exhibition with over 30 essays by the artist that help explain his paintings and reflect his keen interest in the Haisla language.



    Lyle Wilson Artist Talk: Focus on three-dimensional works

    Thursday, July 25, 4:00pm
    Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art
    639 Hornby Street, Vancouver
    Talk included with admission
    Lyle Wilson's Progressions
    Lyle Wilson: Progressions, 2011. Collection of the Artist.

    Join featured Haisla artist Lyle Wilson who will share his personal insights and approach to Northwest Coast art and design. This talk will focus on his three-dimensional works, including: jewelry, masks, frontlets, boxes and model totem poles. Don't miss this opportunity to connect with one of the foremost artists working today.

    About Lyle Wilson
    Born and raised in the Haisla community of Kitamaat, British Columbia, Lyle Wilson studied fine arts and education at both the University of British Columbia and the Emily Carr College of Art and Design. He also undertook an intensive exploration of what he refers to as "the classic Northwest Coast style" while working as a commissioned artist at the Museum of Anthropology at UBC (MOA). The artist’s 20-year association with MOA enabled him to study the work of past masters and develop his own understanding and interpretation of the style of painting popularly known as formline.

    About the Exhibition
    The first major exhibition of paintings by Vancouver-based Haisla artist, Lyle Wilson, revealing his evolving artistic vision and celebrating his accomplishments as a painter. Created over a period of 20 years, this collection of 58 works shows remarkable detail in execution, and reflects narrative themes and personal stories.

    Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson runs through September 15, 2013.

    The presentation of Paint in this Gallery would not have been possible without the generous support of the Deux Mille Foundation, The Mary and Gordon Christopher Family Foundation, Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, and The Listel Hotel.

    We also gratefully acknowledge the support of the following organizations for their respective contributions to the creation of this exhibition and accompanying catalogue: Maple Ridge Pitt Meadows Arts Council, Canada Council for the Arts, The Haisla Nation Council (HNC), Michael O’Brian Family Foundation and the Audain Foundation for the Visual Arts.

    An exhibition catalogue is also available for sale at the Bill Reid Gallery Gift Shop. It offers a comprehensive visual record of the exhibition with over 30 essays by the artist that help explain his paintings and reflect his keen interest in the Haisla language.



    Program on Repatriation

    Thursday, June 13, 4:00 – 6:00pm
    Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art
    639 Hornby Street, Vancouver
    Program included with admission


    Lyle Wilson's Nanakwa #3
    Lyle Wilson: Nanakwa #3. Nanakwa in the Haisla language loosely translates to: “A new beginning.” Photo courtesy of the Artist.

    Join us in the Gallery for a panel discussion on repatriation featuring Bill McLennan, Curator, Pacific Northwest, UBC Museum of Anthropology, Jill Baird, Curator, Education and Public Programs, UBC Museum of Anthropology, Lyle Wilson, Haisla Artist, and Mike Robinson, CEO of the Bill Reid Gallery.

    Repatriation is a highly complex, emotional issue. Exploring this issue means understanding that cultural property may have been taken, appropriated, stolen, sold or given in trust for safekeeping. This panel will share stories from the Museum realm and hope to shed some light on the difficulties faced, and the rewards reaped by all those involved in the repatriation process. This program is presented as a compliment to the featured exhibition Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson.

    About the Exhibition
    The first major exhibition of paintings by Vancouver-based Haisla artist, Lyle Wilson, revealing his evolving artistic vision and celebrating his accomplishments as a painter. Created over a period of 20 years, this collection of 58 works shows remarkable detail in execution, and reflects narrative themes and personal stories.

    Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson runs through September 15, 2013.

    The presentation of Paint in this Gallery would not have been possible without the generous support of the Deux Mille Foundation, The Mary and Gordon Christopher Family Foundation, Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, and The Listel Hotel.

    We also gratefully acknowledge the support of the following organizations for their respective contributions to the creation of this exhibition and accompanying catalogue: Maple Ridge Pitt Meadows Arts Council, Canada Council for the Arts, The Haisla Nation Council (HNC), Michael O’Brian Family Foundation and the Audain Foundation for the Visual Arts.

    An exhibition catalogue is also available for sale at the Bill Reid Gallery Gift Shop. It offers a comprehensive visual record of the exhibition with over 30 essays by the artist that help explain his paintings and reflect his keen interest in the Haisla language.



    Artist's Talk with Lyle Wilson

    Thursday, May 9, 3:30 – 5:00pm
    Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art
    639 Hornby Street, Vancouver
    Talk included with admission


    Lyle Wilson's Octopus
    Lyle Wilson: Octopus, 1993. Collection of the Artist.

    Join featured Haisla artist Lyle Wilson who will share his personal insights and approach to Northwest Coast art and design. Don't miss this opportunity to connect with one of the foremost artists working today.

    About Lyle Wilson
    Born and raised in the Haisla community of Kitamaat, British Columbia, Lyle Wilson studied fine arts and education at both the University of British Columbia and the Emily Carr College of Art and Design. He also undertook an intensive exploration of what he refers to as "the classic Northwest Coast style" while working as a commissioned artist at the Museum of Anthropology at UBC (MOA). The artist’s 20-year association with MOA enabled him to study the work of past masters and develop his own understanding and interpretation of the style of painting popularly known as formline.

    About the Exhibition
    The first major exhibition of paintings by Vancouver-based Haisla artist, Lyle Wilson, revealing his evolving artistic vision and celebrating his accomplishments as a painter. Created over a period of 20 years, this collection of 58 works shows remarkable detail in execution, and reflects narrative themes and personal stories.

    Paint: The Painted Works of Lyle Wilson runs through September 15, 2013.

    The presentation of Paint in this Gallery would not have been possible without the generous support of the Deux Mille Foundation, The Mary and Gordon Christopher Family Foundation, Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, and The Listel Hotel.

    We also gratefully acknowledge the support of the following organizations for their respective contributions to the creation of this exhibition and accompanying catalogue: Maple Ridge Pitt Meadows Arts Council, Canada Council for the Arts, The Haisla Nation Council (HNC), Michael O’Brian Family Foundation and the Audain Foundation for the Visual Arts.

    An exhibition catalogue is also available for sale at the Bill Reid Gallery Gift Shop. It offers a comprehensive visual record of the exhibition with over 30 essays by the artist that help explain his paintings and reflect his keen interest in the Haisla language.



    Laughing "Irregardless": Multimedia Aboriginal Humour

    A series of public programs to complement the exhibition co–curated by Peter Morin and Dr. Martine Reid, Carrying on "Irregardless": Humour in Contemporary Northwest Coast Art, at the Bill Reid Gallery September 12, 2012 - March 17, 2013. Curated and moderated by Aboriginal filmmaker, Loretta Todd, the programs are part of the SFU Public Square events.

    An Evening with Kent Monkman
    Thursday, March 14, 7:00 – 9:00pm
    Fletcher Challenge Theatre (#1900), SFU Vancouver
    515 Hastings Street, Vancouver
    Admission by donation (suggested donation $5.00)

    Kent Monkman
    LEFT: Miss Chief Eagle Testickle, RIGHT: Kent Monkman
    Images courtesy Kent Monkman


    Join Kent Monkman on a journey into his art and life as an artist.

    He says of his art practice: "I think my work is primarily informed by an attempt to define that space between the two cultures," (European and Aboriginal). Kent adds, "It’s a very similar sort of reclaiming of stereotypes that have been harmful, you sort of take them back, you own them, you reclaim them and then you present them from a position of power and that’s really what I wanted to do." Monkman explains the serious side of why and how we laugh at the history in that space between Aboriginal and Colonizer societies.

    He is known for exploring the sexual tension in that space — with the sexual power of characters he creates and embodies — such as Miss Chief Eagle Testickle. Says a reviewer of Monkman’s work at a recent Peabody Museum show, "The Cree artist plays his drag show for laughs, but underlying it are serious questions about white genocide of Native Americans."

    Monkman is a world renowned artist of Cree ancestry. His solo exhibitions have been held at: the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and in 2013 the National Gallery of Canada. He has participated in international group exhibitions including: The American West, at Compton Verney, in Warwickshire, England, and My Winnipeg at Maison Rouge, Paris, France.

    This presentation is part of the SFU Public Square Events and was programmed by award–winning filmmaker and writer Loretta Todd. It is the final public program associated with the exhibition co–curated by Peter Morin and Dr. Martine Reid, Carrying on "Irregardless": Humour in Contemporary Northwest Coast Art, at the Bill Reid Gallery.
    Note: Exhibition must close March 17, 2013.

    Presented by the Bill Reid Gallery with support from: Canada Council for the Arts, Face The World Foundation, SFU Vancouver, SFU Office for Aboriginal Peoples, and in partnership with the Emily Carr University of Art + Design.



    1491s Comedy
    Thursday, February 21, 7:00 – 9:00pm
    Fletcher Challenge Theatre (#1900), SFU Vancouver
    515 Hastings Street, Vancouver
    Admission $18 Adult; $15 Student/Senior (includes tax)


    1491s
    Image courtesy of the 1491s

    The 1491s is a sketch comedy group, based in the wooded ghettos of Minnesota and buffalo grass of Oklahoma. They are a gaggle of Indians chock full of cynicism and splashed with a good dose of indigenous satire. They coined the term All My Relations, and are still waiting for the royalties. They were at Custer’s Last Stand. They mooned Chris Columbus when he landed. They invented bubble gum. The 1491s teach young women how to be strong. And… teach young men how to seduce these strong women. Visit their website for more information

    Featuring a live performance, video clips and an opportunity to chat with the performers. This program is also part of the 2013 Talking Stick Festival (Feb 19 – Mar 3) and SFU Public Square Events . Programmed by award-winning filmmaker and writer Loretta Todd.

    Presented by the Bill Reid Gallery and Full Circle First Nations Performances with support from: Canada Council for the Arts, United States Consulate General Vancouver, Face The World Foundation, SFU Vancouver, and SFU Office for Aboriginal Peoples.



    Ha! Ha! Ha! A Laugh in the Gallery
    Saturday, January 19, 2:30 – 4:30pm
    Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art
    639 Hornby Street, Vancouver
    Admission by donation (suggested donation $5.00)

    Cree App project
             Image courtesy Christopher Auchter and the Cree App project

    Everyone likes to laugh, especially in the middle of a long winter. In many Aboriginal cultures, winter is the time for stories and sharing. Come share a sweet, funny, silly yet thought–provoking afternoon of short films that we made, plus others we admire for their unique humour.

    We are especially proud of the short films made by children about what they find funny or what simply makes them smile. The Smiling Kids’ Media Lab brought together Aboriginal film professional mentors with children to collaborate in the making of short videos. The afternoon will also showcase short films we found near and far that bring to life Aboriginal humour in living colour. And we invite you – the audience – to share a funny story or funny, family–friendly joke in an interactive afternoon.

    So if you want to laugh, guffaw, giggle or just cheer the work of future and established filmmakers, then join us at the Bill Reid Gallery, 639 Hornby Street at 2:30pm on Saturday, January 19, 2013.

    This is the fifth event in a series of seven that explores Aboriginal Humour in Aboriginal Media. Programmed by award–winning filmmaker and writer Loretta Todd, who believes the truth might make you smile.

    The series complements the exhibition co–curated by Peter Morin and Dr. Martine Reid, Carrying on "Irregardless": Humour in Contemporary Northwest Coast Art, at the Bill Reid Gallery September 12, 2012 – March 17, 2013.

    The mentors for the Smiling Kids’ Media Lab are hip–hop stylist Ostwelve (Ron Dean Harris) and media mogul Cheyanna Kootenhayoo, two emerging media stars with lots to say and with lots of respect for our children and their dreams.

    Presented by the Bill Reid Gallery with support from: Canada Council for the Arts, Face The World Foundation, SFU Vancouver and SFU Office for Aboriginal Peoples.



    Talk About Laugh: ’Blak Comedy & Indigenous Cultural Perspectives On Humour’
    Thursday, December 6, 6:00 – 8:00pm
    Terasen Cinema (Room Number:1800), SFU Vancouver
    515 Hastings Street, Vancouver
    Admission by donation (suggested donation $5.00)

    Aunty Maggie and the Womba Wakgun
    Aunty Maggie and the Womba Wakgun

    Aboriginal comedy writer Angelina Hurley, is currently completing her Doctorate of Creative Arts on Indigenous humour and was awarded a prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. "Through my research topic, ’Blak Comedy and Indigenous Cultural Perspectives on Humour’, I am investigating the development of Australian Indigenous comedy," Angelina said. "The genre of Indigenous comedy predominantly lives within the Indigenous community itself, unknown to mainstream Australia and is still to break through there."

    Her award-winning short film called Aunty Maggie and the Womba Wakgun (2009), is based on a true family story, Aunty Maggie saves the family from destitution by giving mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to the family rooster.

    After screening this 12-minute film CBC reporter Duncan McCue (Anishinaabe) will talk with Angelina about her film and research.

    Aunty Maggie and the Womba Wakgun (2009)
    Written by Angelina Hurley and directed by Leah Purcell.
    Part of the Bungaburra Productions Short Black Initiative of Screen Australia.
    Awards: Best Australian Film at the Heart of Gold International Film Festival.

    Presented by the Bill Reid Gallery with support from: Canada Council for the Arts, Vancouver, SFU Vancouver and SFU Office for Aboriginal Peoples.



    The Serious Side of Humour: Use of Clowning and Humour in Traditional Storytelling
    Thursday, November 15, 6:00 – 8:00pm
    Fletcher Challenge Theatre, SFU Vancouver
    515 Hastings Street, Vancouver
    Admission by donation (suggested donation $5.00)

    Click here to see photos of Victor at Simon Fraser University, Point Grey Secondary School and the University of British Columbia's Museum of Anthropology. Images courtesy of the U.S. Consulate General Vancouver.
    Click here to read the article by the Consulate on Victor's visit.

    Victor Masayesva
    Victor Masayesva

    Join us as Victor Masayesva (Hopi) screens his new version of the important documentary Ritual Clowns (1988). Through poetic visualization and lyrical translation of Hopi myths, rituals, and history, he explores the evolving and enduring role of the clown in Hopi society. This experimental video is eclectic in its treatment of the illusory ritual clown figures through a combination of live video, ancient oral traditions and computer-generated animation. Maintaining the perspective of the clown as a mirror of human behaviour, the film explores the acerbic and ritually cleansing roles of humour, parody, reversals, and prophecy in Southwest Native American rituals and ceremonies.

    Following the 40-minute screening, Victor will discuss the use of humour in traditional storytelling and how oral traditions influence his work.

    Victor Masayesva is a Hopi media artist with deep knowledge and understanding of the Hopi cultural practices. His visually and intellectually complex layering of video and audio effects, still photographs and hand-painting contrast aspects of Native American cultures with the crippling perceptions and influences of white culture. Raised on Hotevilla on Third Mesa in Hopi, Masayesva graduated from Princeton University, majoring in literature and studying photography with Emmet Gowin. He has been honoured with numerous awards including the University of Arizona Distinguished Alumni Award, the Gold Hugo at Chicago Festival, Two Rivers Visionary Award, Taos Festival's distinguished filmmaker award and the American Film Institute's Maya Deren Award.

    Presented by the Bill Reid Gallery with support from: Canada Council for the Arts, United States Consulate General Vancouver, SFU Vancouver and SFU Office for Aboriginal Peoples.



    The Enduring Power of Smoke Signals and the Making of an Iconic Character
    Thursday, October 25, 6:00 – 8:00pm
    Fletcher Challenge Theatre, SFU Vancouver
    515 Hastings Street, Vancouver
    Admission by donation (suggested donation $5.00)

    Dr Evan Adams and Duncan McCue
    L: Dr. Evan Adams R: Duncan McCue

    Following a screening of Smoke Signals (written by Sherman Alexie), Dr. Evan Adams (Sliammon), BC Deputy Provincial Health Officer and actor, will discuss with Duncan McCue (Anishinaabe), CBC, the enduring power of story telling and how humour helps deal with difficult realities of family histories.

    Dr. Adams sees the value of humour and storytelling from the perspective of healing and discusses Aboriginal humour from the perspective of actor, storyteller and doctor. Mr. McCue, as an award-winning broadcast journalist and professor, understands the complexity of good storytelling.

    Evan Adams is a Coast Salish actor and physician from the Sliammon Band near Powell River, BC, Canada. Evan is a full-scholarship alumnus of St. Michaels University School and of Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific — both of Victoria, BC.
    Evan stars in the Emmy-winning TV-movie Lost in the Barrens and its nominated sequel Curse of the Viking Grave and as Thomas Builds-The-Fire in ShadowCatcher Entertainment’s Smoke Signals, written by Sherman Alexie and directed by Chris Eyre, for which he won Best Actor awards from the American Indian Film Festival, and from First Americans in the Arts, and a 1999 Independent Spirit Award. Evan is the past host of Aboriginal Peoples Television Network’s #1-rated show Buffalo Tracks, starred in FallsApart Production’s American feature The Business of Fancydancing, and had a recurring role on the CBC TV-series Da Vinci’s City Hall.

    Duncan McCue has been a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for 12 years. His award-winning news and current affairs pieces are featured on CBC’s flagship news show, CBC News The National.
    McCue’s recent honours include a Jack Webster Award for Best Feature, and he was awarded a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University for 2010-2011. Prior to that, he was awarded a network RTNDA Award for Best Long Feature, and his second regional RTNDA Diversity Award for his coverage of aboriginal issues.

    Presented by the Bill Reid Gallery with support from: Canada Council for the Arts, SFU Vancouver, and SFU Office for Aboriginal Peoples.



    An Evening with Drew Hayden Taylor – What Makes him Laugh?
    Thursday, September 13, 6:00 – 8:00pm
    Fletcher Challenge Theatre, SFU Vancouver
    515 Hastings Street, Vancouver
    Admission by donation (suggested donation $5.00)

    Drew and Skeena
    L: Drew Hayden Taylor. R: Skeena Reece.

    Drew Hayden Taylor (Ojibway) author, award-winning playwright, and film director in conversation with Skeena Reece (Tsimshian, Gitksan, Cree, Metis) performance artist.

    Drew directed Redskins, Tricksters and Puppy Stew in 2000, a documentary that asked fellow writers and Aboriginal creative luminaries what makes them laugh, why Aboriginal humour, and what is there to laugh about? Now we ask Drew what makes him laugh. How does his creative work weave absent fathers and abandonment issues into funny stuff? Screening of Redskins,Tricksters and Puppy Stew to follow.
    Click Here for Drew Hayden Taylor's website.

    Presented by the Bill Reid Gallery with support from: Canada Council for the Arts, United States Consulate General Vancouver, SFU Vancouver and SFU Office for Aboriginal Peoples.



    Severn Cullis-Suzuki
    Environment and Culture Activist, Student of the Haida Language

    Learning and Teaching the Haida Language
    Thursday, July 26, 2012
    from 3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Severn Cullis-Suzuki
    Severn Cullis-Suzuki. Photo: Rolf Bettner

    As a student of the Haida language, Severn has completed two years of a Master Apprenticeship Program. This program allows her to work one on one with a fluent speaker, which has proven to be a successful method of learning Xaayda Kil (The Haida language). She will share her experiences in the Master Apprenticeship Program along with her creative journey in publishing 29 short children’s books in Haida, which she did in partnership with the Elders at the Skidegate Haida Immersion Program (SHIP).

    About Severn Cullis-Suzuki
    Culture and environmental activist and writer. Severn lives on Haida Gwaii with her husband and two sons. She is a Champion for the Canadian Earth Summit Initiative 2012 WE CANada, host of the APTN series ’Samaqan – Water Stories, and board member of the Haida Gwaii Higher Education and the David Suzuki Foundation. She holds a B.Sc. in Biology from Yale University and an M.Sc. in Ethnoecology from the University of Victoria, where she studied with elders from the Kwakwaka’wakw First Nations.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery's featured exhibition. That Which Makes Us Haida – the Haida Language documents the last remaining fluent speakers of the Haida language and their dedication to keeping their language alive, through riveting personal portraits and insightful interviews with elders.
    This exhibition runs through September 2, 2012.



    Revitalization of the Xaad Kil (Haida) Language
    Saturday, June 9, 2012
    from 3:00pm - 4:00pm
    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    As part of our featured exhibition That Which Makes Us Haida – the Haida Language join join Marianne Ignace as she speaks about her research and experience with the Xaad Kil (Haida) Language.

    Marianne Ignace
    Marianne Ignace. Photo: Courtesy of SFU

    Main points of discussion:
  • How Xaad Kil "works" as a language: the fascinating ways in which the language encodes knowledge, organizes experience and embeds social and "on the land" experience in ways of speaking.
  • How Xaad Kil speakers deploy(ed) their knowledge of the language in social life: how oratory or speech making works - with examples from historic potlatch speeches.
  • How oral traditions and histories express what we can call traditional Haida law.

  • About Marianne Ignace
    For the past 20 years, Dr. Ignace has focused her research on the Secwepemc (Shuswap) people of the Plateau, where her interests are aboriginal land use and occupancy, ethnobotany, traditional ecological knowledge, ethnohistory, and the linguistic and anthropological analysis of Aboriginal language discourse. She has authored and co-authored papers in various journals and books on these topics, and has also carried out research in the field of Aboriginal language revitalization. In recent years, she has worked with First Nations communities and elders on various language revitalization projects, including Secwepemctsin, St’at’imcets, Heiltsuk, Nuxalk, Haida and Sm’algyax.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery's featured exhibition. That Which Makes Us Haida – the Haida Language documents the last remaining fluent speakers of the Haida language and their dedication to keeping their language alive, through riveting personal portraits and insightful interviews with elders.
    This exhibition runs through September 9, 2012.



    Art and Language
    Saturday, May 5, 2012
    from 3:00pm - 4:00pm
    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    As part of our featured exhibition That Which Makes Us Haida – the Haida Language join Marianne Nicolson, a Dzawada’enuxw (Kwakwaka’wakw) artist and fluent speaker of Kwakwa’la. She will speak about her research and findings on the theme of the relationship between her language, Kwakwa’la, knowledge, and art.

    Tunic for a Noblewoman
    Marianne Nicolson: Tunic for a Noblewoman: In Memory of ’Wadzidalaga, 2008–2009. Photo: Kenji Nagai

    Marianne Nicolson is a Dzawada’enuxw (Kwakwaka’wakw) artist based in Victoria. Marianne has a BFA from Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and a MFA in Visual Art from the University of Victoria. Marianne is interested in pursuing a deeper understanding of the Kwakwaka'wakw language, Kwakwa’la, and how this language and art address concepts of space and time in the context of an indigenous worldview. This has led her to complete an MA in Linguistics and Anthropology and now pursue a PhD at the University of Victoria. Marianne works in a diverse range of artistic media, including painting, photography, mixed-media, sculpture and installation and her work is shown nationally and internationally.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery's featured exhibition. That Which Makes Us Haida – the Haida Language documents the last remaining fluent speakers of the Haida language and their dedication to keeping their language alive, through riveting personal portraits and insightful interviews with elders.
    This exhibition runs through September 9, 2012.



    Thoughtful Lens Across Cultures
    Saturday, February 25, 2012
    from 2:00pm - 3:30pm
    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Come and listen to a speaker whose lens peers across cultures.

    Steaming of Lootaas
    The Steaming of Lootaas,1985. Photo © Robert Semeniuk

    Acclaimed photojournalist Robert Semeniuk has worked with Palestinian children in Lebanese refugee camps, the Canadian Inuit, and Bill Reid - as he created Lootaas (Wave Eater) on the beach at Skidegate in 1985.

    Semeniuk dramatically recorded Reid’s whole creative process: the falling of the 750 year-old tree, the carving, the steaming and spreading, the painting and the private launching on Haida Gwaii.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery's featured exhibition Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe. This exhibition conveys the pivotal role of the canoe in Northwest Coast art, cultures and communities, through photos by Phil Hersee and Robert Semeniuk, and sketches by Bill Reid. The exhibition runs through March 24, 2012.




    Transformation from Sapling to Sea
    Saturday, February 4, 2012
    from 2:00pm - 3:30pm
    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Ray Natraoro
    Doug Paul and Ray Natraoro. Photo: Gary Fiegehen Photography

    Ray Natraoro has carved 19 Salish dugout canoes. He will bring his insight into what it takes to transform a tree into a seagoing canoe. Choosing the right tree in the forest to carve a canoe is no simple task. Any tree that is chosen needs to exhibit some very special characteristics. Master canoe carver Natraoro will talk about how these specific characteristics determine the destiny of the tree.

    Sesiyam, Ray Natraoro (formerly Natrall) is of Salish and Tuchone descent. He was born and raised in Vancouver and is the 7th generation craftsman in his family who has transformed monumental red cedar into seagoing ocean canoes.

    Natraoro is a highly respected Master Carver dedicated to his community, family, culture and the creation of high quality Coast Salish art. In addition to his art, he is currently working towards earning his certificate to teach the Squamish Language.

    This public program is presented as a part of the Gallery’s featured exhibition Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe. This exhibition conveys the pivotal role of the canoe in the Northwest Coast art, cultures and communities, through photos by Phil Hersee and Robert Semeniuk, and sketches by Bill Reid.The exhibition runs through March 24, 2012.




    TELUS LOGO Book Launch: Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe
    Thursday, December 8, 2011
    from 5:00pm - 7:00pm
    FREE Admission

    Book cover
    Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe
    Cover courtesy of Harbour Publishing
    Photo: © Philip Hersee Photography


    Join Dr. Martine Reid, principal author and editor of Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe at the Bill Reid Gallery, Thursday, December 8th, 5:00 – 7:00pm for the launch of this new book, published by Harbour Publishing.

    Program
          5:15pm Remarks by Dr. Martine Reid
          5:30pm General discussion and book signing by Dr. Reid

    Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe tells the story of the pivotal role of the canoe in Northwest Coast art, cultures and communities. It traces its zenith in pre-contact times, through its decline in the late nineteenth century, to its revival in Lootaas (Wave Eater) which Bill Reid and his team carved for Expo ’86, to its culmination in tribal canoe journeys of the twenty-first century and The Spirit of Haida Gwaii sculptures. Bill Reid expressed awe for the traditional Haida canoe and what it represents visually, symbolically, and culturally. In his words, “Western art starts with the figure – West Coast Indian art starts with the canoe.”
    “Too often, the Northwest canoe has been portrayed primarily as a utilitarian object. We see the canoe as a complex, multi-faceted symbol, an essential carrier of culture, and as art. Through the telling of Haida artist Bill Reid's intellectual and physical involvement with canoes, we discover new insights into his creative journey, the place of the canoe within it and within the larger spectrum of his artistic development and practice. Reid’s understanding of the symbolic power of the canoe to connect people to each other, to the land and the sea, to their past and future, and to a renewed sense of themselves guided his journey to the end”, says Dr. Martine Reid.
    The story is told through writings and artworks by Bill Reid, consummate photographs by Phillip Hersee, Ulli Steltzer, Robert Semeniuk and others, texts by Dr. James Raffan, Dr. Martine Reid, and Mike Robinson, and first-hand accounts by First Nations paddlers and canoe makers.

    Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe is a companion book to the eponymous exhibition mounted by the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art that runs until March 24, 2012 and will subsequently tour to the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough, Ontario.

    The Bill Reid Gallery acknowledges the generous support of TELUS on this project.

    Principal author and editor Dr. Martine Reid is Director of Content and Research at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art in Vancouver, BC.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.




    Red Cedar Archaeology
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011
    from 2:30pm - 3:30pm

    K'aas Gaandlay
    K’aas Gaandlay. Photo: Elizabeth Bulbrook

    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Join Elizabeth Bulbrook MA, former Heritage Coordinator for the Council of Haida Nation’s Forest Guardians, for a presentation on Red Cedar Archaeology (RCA).

    Red Cedar Archaeology (RCA) is the study of red cedar trees (Thuja plicata) that have been culturally modified by First Nations people in British Columbia. The term RCA was coined by Haida historian and consultant Captain Gold, English name Richard S. Wilson, who has over 35 years experience in the field of Haida Gwaii archaeology. RCA is used to identify various classifications of red cedar trees based on what they were traditionally harvested for. The canoe classification being the highest quality of tree that could be found in the forest, followed by trees that could be used for totem poles, houses and harvested for bark. Elizabeth’s presentation will introduce the study of Culturally Modified Trees, RCA and its benefits to the artistic traditions amongst the First Nations peoples of the Northwest Coast.

    This public program is presented as a part of the Gallery’s featured exhibition. Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe conveys the pivotal role of the canoe in the Northwest Coast art, cultures and communities, through photos by Phil Hersee and Robert Semeniuk, and sketches by Bill Reid.

    The exhibition runs through January 8, 2012.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.


    Mamook Chantie - Traditional Singing
    Wednesday, July 20, 2011
    from 7:00pm - 8:30pm

    SKG K Jones
    Skidegate Performance, 2007. Photo: Kwiaahwah Jones

    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Mamook Chantie is a term in Chinook (trading jargon developed throughout the Northwest Coast) meaning to sing. Every coastal nation celebrates with song and dance. There is a great diversity and depth of songs and music throughout the region, as this musical tradition has developed over thousands of years.

    Through Mamook Chantie you will experience and celebrate the singing traditions of four different Northwest Coast nations: Salish, Kwakwakw’akw, Tsimshian and Haida. Each singer will share canoe travel songs, welcome songs, traded songs from other nations, and their meanings.

    This public program is presented as a part of the Gallery’s featured exhibition. Bill Reid and the Haida Canoe conveys the pivotal role of the canoe in the Northwest Coast art, cultures and communities, through photos by Phil Hersee and Robert Semeniuk, and sketches by Bill Reid.

    The exhibition runs through January 8, 2012.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.


    Peter Morin Reflects on his Curatorial Approach
    Saturday, June, 4 2011 DATE CHANGE - Sunday, June 5, 2011
    from 3:00pm - 4:00pm

    Kispiox
    Kispiox, Gitxsan, Skeena Valley, 1967. Photo: © Adelaide de Menil

    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    In Revisiting the Silence, guest curator Peter Morin has selected 22 powerful images of an 800 image body of work created by New York photographer, Adelaide de Menil during her journeys to see totem poles from 1966 to 1968. Morin will talk about his curatorial process, following indigenous practices to create this exhibition, and unfold his sense of the image telling a story of the land. The inspiration for this exhibition emerged from the collaborative publication, Out of the Silence, (published in 1971 and now out of print) featuring text by Bill Reid in concert with 66 of De Menil’s documentary works.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery’s featured exhibition. Revisiting the Silence follows the tradition of travelling to see the totem poles along the Northwest Coast, as reflected in the powerful black and white photos taken by New York photographer, Adelaide de Menil in the 1960s.

    The exhibition has been extended and will run through June 12, 2011.

    PETER MORIN
    Peter Morin is a Tahltan Nation artist and curator. He is a recent MFA graduate of UBC Okanagan. Peter’s work looks deeply into de-colonization and healing through indigenous language learning and speaking. As a practicing curator, Peter explores issues of land, history, and indigenous ways of knowing. Peter is also a community educator, who draws on art to help First Nations youth reconnect with their culture and traditional practices. In 2010 Peter received the British Columbia Creative Achievement Award for First Nations’ Art.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.


    Senescence, Death and Rebirth in the Rainforest
    Saturday, April, 30 2011
    from 2:00pm - 3:00pm

    Old Kasaan
    Old Kasaan, Kaigani Haida, Alaska, 1968. Photo: © Adelaide de Menil

    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    In the moist and cool rainforests of coastal British Columbia, trees grow to immense size and great longevity. Fire is nearly absent, and unless logged, these primeval rainforests can persist for centuries undisturbed. Individual trees do eventually grow old, decay and die naturally, and it is this subtle process of mortality that is at the heart of the rainforest’s renewal. Dr. Moola will parallel a core observation of Revisiting the Silence, where we see the resting places for some of the totem poles that were able to finish their lives and return to the earth. Standing snags support rainforest gardens, and downed logs become the homes and habitat for a cornucopia of plants and animals - as do totem poles. Join the David Suzuki Foundation's Science Director, Dr. Faisal Moola, on an exploration of BC's ancient rainforests.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery’s featured exhibition. Revisiting the Silence follows the tradition of travelling to see the totem poles along the Northwest Coast, as reflected in the powerful black and white photos taken by New York photographer, Adelaide de Menil in the 1960s. The exhibition runs through June 5, 2011.

    FAISLA MOOLA PH.D.
    Dr. Faisal Moola is the Director of the Terrestrial Conservation and Science Program at the David Suzuki Foundation and an adjunct professor of Forest Conservation at the University of Toronto. Faisal is a practicing scientist and has published widely in scientific journals on ecology, conservation biology, and environmental policy. He has conducted research in some of Canada's most significant wilderness areas, such as the Boreal Forest, the old-growth rainforests of British Columbia and the Acadian woodlands of Atlantic Canada.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.



    Photographing the Totems:
    The Expeditions of Adelaide de Menil
    Saturday, April, 2 2011
    from 2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Village Island
    Village Island, Tlingit, Alaska, 1968. Photo: © Adelaide de Menil

    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    In 1966, Adelaide de Menil began her four journeys to coastal villages, from Washington State through British Columbia, and north to Alaska. In this program, Dr. George MacDonald, Director of the Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Art Studies at Simon Fraser University, will give important insight into these photographic expeditions of de Menil, which turned out to be the last comprehensive examination of poles and monumental art of the Northwest Coast Art in their original locations, where most of them returned to the land.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery’s featured exhibition. Revisiting the Silence follows the tradition of travelling to see the totem poles along the Northwest Coast, as reflected in the powerful black and white photos taken by New York photographer, Adelaide de Menil in the 1960s. The exhibition runs through June 5, 2011.

    GEORGE F. MACDONALD, C.M. Ph.D.
    Director Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Art Studies
    at Simon Fraser University

    A renowned expert on Northwest Coast art, Dr. MacDonald has written a series of books on the subject including Haida Monumental Art, published by UBC Press. Some others are: Haida Art, Chiefs of the Sea and the Sky, and Ninstints: A World Heritage Site.
    Dr. MacDonald is the Director of the Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Art Studies, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and holds an LL.D. from the University of Calgary. He was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in July 2006.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.



    Time Warp - It's A Wrap
    Saturday, February, 26 2011
    from 2:00pm - 4:30pm
    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Join internationally renowned textile artists, Delores Churchill, Evelyn Vanderhoop, and Lisa Telford as they bid a fond farewell to our groundbreaking textiles exhibition Time Warp: Contemporary Textiles of the Northwest Coast. Program highlights will include remarks by the artists, and dancing of robes to traditional drumming.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery's featured exhibition, Time Warp: Contemporary Textiles of the Northwest Coast. Time Warp celebrates the textile and fibre art of 20 emerging, mid-career and internationally recognized Aboriginal artists from Alaska, Yukon, BC, and Washington State. The exhibition runs through Feb 27, 2011.

    TW_Its_A_Warp
    Left: Evelyn Vanderhoop and Delores Churchill, Participating artists. Photo: Anne Seymour.
    Right Top: "Ice Man Hat", circa 2003, Delores Churchill; Right Bottom: Pocha Haida, 2009, Lisa Telford. Photos: Kenji Nagai


    DELORES CHURCHILL Haida
    Master weaver and teacher, she is credited with being instrumental in reviving and keeping traditional Haida weaving alive for future generations. She has mentored both Evelyn Vanderhoop and Lisa Telford.

    EVELYN VANDERHOOP Haida
    Exhibition Co-curator, Haida artist and master weaver. Evelyn has specialized in Naaxiin (Chilkat) regalia for 16 years and is one of only a handful of weavers who has mastered this complex technique. Sharing and Teaching this knowledge is one of her life goals.

    LISA TELFORD Haida
    Lisa comes from a long line of weavers. Recognized internationally for her creativity in weaving contemporary cedar bark dresses and shoes.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.


    Weaving Demonstration
    Saturday, January 29 and Sunday January 30, 2011
    from 1:30pm - 3:30pm
    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Clarissa is one of 20 Aboriginal fibre artists participating in the Gallery's featured exhibition, Time Warp. Of Tlingit ancestry, she is a dynamic presenter and excels in both Naaxiin and Raven's Tail weaving and other art media, winning six best-of-show awards to date. She will be demonstrating both Raven's Tail and Naaxiin (Chilkat) weaving.

    This public program is presented as part of the Gallery's featured exhibition, Time Warp: Contemporary Textiles of the Northwest Coast. Time Warp celebrates the textile and fibre art of 20 emerging, mid-career and internationally recognized Aboriginal artists from Alaska, Yukon, BC, and Washington State. The exhibition runs through Feb 27, 2011.

    Clarissa Rizal
    LEFT: Clarissa Rizal at the Time Warp Opening Reception. Photo: Anne Seymour
    RIGHT: Copper Child by Clarissa Rizal and Lily Hudson, Photo by Brain Wallace


    CLARISSA RIZAL Tlingit
    Clarissa Hudson excels in both Naaxiin and Raven's Tail weaving and other art media, winning six best-of-show awards to date. Clarissa apprenticed with Naaxiin weaver, Jenny Thlunaut, and took classes with Selina Peratrovich, Delores Churchill and Cheryl Samuel. She studied clothing design and metalsmithing at the Institute of American Indian Arts, in Santa Fe, NM. Between 1983 and 2005, she designed and created 50 traditional Alaskan ceremonial robes. She attended the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, and majored in Art at the Lewis College, Durango, Colorado.

    Veiw Event Photos on Flickr

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.


    Gender and Weaving
    Saturday, December 4, 2010 from 1:00pm - 2:30pm
    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Among the many art forms on the Northwest Coast, weaving has been marginalized and viewed as "women’s work", implying purely decorative and without meaning. This session, led by textile artist, William White, will explore how perceptions of gender contributed to the exclusion of textiles within Northwest Coast art forms.

    William White
    LEFT: Thunderbird Apron 2006, William White. Photo: Kenji Nagai
    RIGHT: William White at the Time Warp Opening Reception. Photo: Anne Seymour


    WILLIAM WHITE Tsimshian
    William White, Lii Am Laxuu, is Tsimshian and a member of the Raven Clan of the Git-wil-gyoots, "the people of the seaweed", from Lax Kw'alaams, northern BC. William has chosen a very unusual artistic path. In 1982, while he was in his early twenties, he started to learn basketry and traditional Chilkat (Naaxiin) style of weaving with his aunt Betty Sampson. He later studied with renowned Haida weaver Delores Churchill taking up an art form traditionally the sole domain of women. In doing so, he preserved one of the most important artistic traditions of his people. As a man practicing a traditional women's art form, his journey has not been without challenges and self-doubt. Wiliam is a passionate teacher, training many Tsimshian and other Northwest Coast First Nations students in basketry, Raven's Tail and Chilkat (Naaxiin) weaving styles. He works on the balance point between tradition and innovation. William White received the BC Aboriginal Achievement Award in 2007. In 2008, he was given the hereditary house chief's name Tsymiyaanbiin, "Barnacles on the Belly of the Supernatural Being". William White lives in Prince Rupert, BC.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.


    The Power of Weaving
    Saturday, November 6, 2010 from 2:00pm to 4:00pm
    Included with regular Gallery Admission
    Adults $10, Seniors/Students $7, Youth/Child $5 (plus HST)
    Members FREE

    Time Warp textile artists Debra and Robyn Sparrow will demonstrate Coast Salish weaving and spinning techniques. Hear about their discoveries of old pieces in various international museums and their journey as contemporary weavers. They will also talk about the symbolic meaning of geometric designs, the mesmerizing effect of the whorl on the spinner, and the power imbued in weaving.

    Debra Sparrow
    DEBRA SPARROW Coast Salish Ceremonial Dress 2010
    Commissioned for the Olympics’ opening ceremony
    Merino wool
    Photo: Kenji Nagai


    DEBRA SPARROW Coast Salish, Musqueam, Vancouver, B.C.
    Debra Sparrow and her sister, Robyn Sparrow, were commissioned to create original works of art for the 2010 Vancouver Olympic games. Together they created two weavings, Thunderbirds and Keepers of the Sky that are now permanent installations in the Thunderbird Arena at the University of B.C. Debra a versatile artist collaborated with Stuart Iwasaki to create the graphic design of the Team Canada 2010 Olympic hockey jersey produced by Nike.

    ROBYN SPARROW
    Coast Salish, Musqueam, Vancouver, B.C.
    Robyn was among the first group of Musqueam women who revived the Coast Salish weaving practice that had been lost for almost a hundred years. She researched and studied Coast Salish weavings in North American museum collections and was a resource teacher and instructor at the Museum of Anthropology and at Point Grey Secondary School. She is the Co-Director of the Musqueam Weaving School, on the Advisory Committee for the Vancouver Airport Authority, and a resource teacher and artist-in-residence at the Southlands Elementary School.

    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.


    Our Silent Teachers: Weavings of the Past for our Future
    Friday, July 16, 2010 from 11:00am to 12:30pm
    Members: $8, General: $10 (plus HST)

    Meet the Time Warp artists who will share their knowledge of their connections to the ancient Northwest Coast weaving styles.

    Hear Delores Churchill's personal story of how she wove an exact replica of a spruce root hat worn by the pre-historic "Ice Man" (discovered in 1999 in the Yukon). The story culminates when she discovered through DNA tests that she is genetically related to the "Ice Man", a fact which brought great joy to her and her family.

    Delores is a renowned Haida weaver of bark, root and wool, a mentor to many artists and recipient of multiple international awards. She lives in Ketchikan, Alaska.

    Ice Man Hat
    DELORES CHURCHILL
    "Ice Man" or "Kwaday Dän Ts’inchi" Hat circa 2003
    Spruce root, ermine. Collection: Courtesy of Dr. Sharon Busby
    Photo: Ron Reeder


    MORE INFO: info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 222.


    PAAW

    June 17 - July 11, 2010

    The Bill Reid Gallery launched a Public Aboriginal Art Walk (PAAW) on June 17, 2010 as a kick-off to
    National Aboriginal Day on June 21.

    The art walk was a great success with many participants.
    Read Miss 604's blog

    AND THE WINNER IS...
    All of the trivia question submissions were compiled and reviewed.
    The final draw on Monday July 12, 2010 revealed the following winners:

    - TERI DAMRON: limited edition print by Haida artist John Brent Bennett
    - FINLAY MCINNES: annual membership to the Bill Reid Gallery
    - SHEILA KIRKBY: 2 complimentary admission tickets to the Bill Reid Gallery
    - DOROTHY MILLS: 2 complimentary admission tickets to the Bill Reid Gallery
    - JUDY LINDSAY: 2 complimentary admission tickets to the Bill Reid Gallery

    The above individuals have been notified via email.
    For any questions, contact Navida at info [@] billreidgallery.ca or 604.682.3455 x 223.

    Thank you to all who participated!

    ABOVE: Human Spirit by Susan Point. On display at the Vancouver Convention Centre.



    A Lecture by Dr. Marie Mauzé
    Honourary Director, Bill Reid Foundation
    Wednesday, January 27, 2010 from 5:30pm to 7pm

    Places and Meanings: The Peculiar Destiny of a Kwakwak’ awakw Headdress
    Admission by Donation
    Sponsored by Scriba International Art Society

    Marie Mauze
    Photo of headdress courtesy of the U’Mista Cultural Centre, Alert Bay
    Photo of Dr. Mauzé courtesy of l’ Ècole des Hautes Ètudes en Sciences Sociales, ADD Paris

    Dr. Marie Mauzé will address three important moments in the life of a unique object, a Kwakwak’ awakw ceremonial headdress, from the time it was confiscated by the Canadian government in 1922 to its return some 80 years later to the U’Mista Cultural Centre in Alert Bay.

    Dr. Marie Mauzé is a French scholar in the field of Northwest Coast ethnology, anthropology of art and aesthetics, material culture studies, history of collecting, museums and representation of native societies. She holds a Masters degree in Interdisciplinary studies from Oregon State University, Corvallis. She has conducted research in BC with the Kwakwak’ awakw people since 1980, and received her doctorate in anthropology from Paris, Ècole des hautes ètudes en sciences sociales (EPHESS) in 1985. Since 2000, she has been a senior researcher at the National Centre for Scientific Research, Laboratoire d’anthropologie sociale (Collège de France, Paris). She authored many articles in French and English that were published in scholarly journals, and has edited several books in French and in English.



    Artist Talks

    A series of talks featuring artists of the Gallery's current exhibition
    Continuum: Vision and Creativity on the Northwest Coast.

    Continuum


    Sonny Assu
    Wednesday January 20, 2010, 5:30 - 7pm
    Assu merges Northwest Coast Aboriginal iconography with the aesthetics of popular culture to challenge social and historical values that we as a society face on a daily basis. He has a BFA from Emily Carr University of Art + Design and has exhibited his work internationally.

    Mike Dangeli
    Wednesday September 30, 2009, 5:30 - 7pm
    Dangeli lives and works in East Vancouver. He has taught workshops and demonstrated his work internationally. He is a founding director and dancer of the internationally recognized performance group Git Hayetsk.

    Nicholas Galanin
    Saturday October 24, 2009, 2:00 - 3:30pm
    Galanin lives and works in Sitka, AK. He has a Master's degree in Indigenous Visual Arts, Massey University, NZ, and a BA (Honours), London Guildhall University, UK. He has exhibited his work internationally and is opening a solo exhibition at the Grunt Gallery Friday, October 23, 2009.

    Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas
    Wednesday November 25, 2009, 5:30 - 7pm
    Yahgulanaas lives and works on Bowen Island. He has published a number of books including the award winning Flight of the Hummingbird, Greystone Books, 2008, and forthcoming Red, Douglas & McIntyre, 2009. He has exhibited his work internationally.

    Adults $8
    Seniors/Students $6
    Members $5
    (includes Gallery admission one hour prior to the event)


    Celebrating the canoe as a wonder of Canada
    Thursday November 5, 2009 from 12:00 to 1:00pm
    Admission by donation

    A lively and entertaining lunchtime presentation by Dr. James Raffan, Executive Director of the Canadian Canoe Museum.



    Lessons from the Canoe
    A Free Noon-Hour Talk
    Wednesday, May 20, 2009 from 12 – 1pm

    The Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art will host a free noon-hour talk entitled Lessons from the Canoe by Sanford Osler on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 from 12 – 1pm. Sanford Osler is a canoeist with a keen interest in the historical role of the canoe, and its relevance today. His talk will highlight the revitalization of the canoe through the work of Bill Reid and conclude with lessons and insights to be learned from the canoe.

    "I will be honouring the wisdom and resourcefulness of the Aboriginal designers and builders who created such beautiful, functional, and enduring crafts," says Osler, "and I will be discussing the role canoes have played, and continue to play, in facilitating relations between people. Not only is the canoe the ultimate form of sustainable transportation, it is also significant as a vessel helping people on their spiritual journeys."

    Osler was introduced to the canoe as a youngster at summer camp and has been in love with it ever since. He has owned a red 16’ cedar canvas canoe for the last 35 years and has taken it on many trips throughout Canada, including the Algonquin, Haliburton and Temagami lakes and rivers in Ontario, and the Broken Islands, Bowron Lakes and Gulf Islands here in B.C. He is a member of the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough, Ontario and of the Northwest Chapter of the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association.

    Osler’s talk will be 30 minutes allowing guests time to explore the Gallery (admission will be free for this event). The Gallery is named after the acclaimed Haida artist Bill Reid, and features over 60 pieces of his gold and silver jewelry, his bronze masterpiece Mythic Messengers, and a full scale totem pole carved by James Hart of Haida Gwaii.

    For more information:

    Contact: Paula Fairweather
    Phone: 604-682-3455 ext. 222
    Email: info [@] billreidgallery.ca



    Dorothy Grant logo

    Haida Fashion Designer Dorothy Grant

    Fashion Show


    Thursday, February 12, 2009 12 pm to 1 pm

    Join renowned Haida fashion designer Dorothy Grant in the Gallery as she presents her latest design collection. Dorothy was the 2008 recipient of the Honor Award presented by Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. She'll be available after the show for fashion consultations.

    Members: $40

    Non-members: $45

    Includes fashion show, light lunch and admission to the Gallery

    To register please call 604.682.3455

    or email info [@] billreidgallery.ca.



    A Tribute to Claude Lévi–Strauss
    Friday, November 28, 2008

    Bill Reid and Claude Levi-Strauss
    On the occasion of the 100th birthday of Claude Lévi–Strauss
    World–renowned French anthropologist
    Honourary Director of the Bill Reid Foundation
    Admission is Free

    Please join us in a tribute to Professor Lévi–Strauss.
    Program Welcome by Dr. Martine Reid in the presence of the Consulate General of France
    Master of Ceremonies Miles Richardson III
    Readings by Vicki Gabereau and Christopher Gaze
    Film by Frédéric Mitterrand — Les Amériques de Claude Lévi-Strauss


    Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Art Studies at SFU
    PRESENTS
    Lecture Series by Dr. George MacDonald, Centre Director

    November, 5, 12, 19, 2008 from 6:30 - 8:30 pm

    Three evening presentations by Dr. George F. MacDonald, explore through historical photographs the distinctive art of twenty-five Haida villages, that stretch along the north coast from the World Heritage Site of SGang Gwaay at the southern tip of Haida Gwaii to the Kaigani villages of Southeast Alaska.

    A renowned expert on Northwest Coast art, Dr. MacDonald has written a series of books on the subject including Haida Monumental Art, published by UBC Press. Some others are: Haida Art, Chiefs of the Sea and the Sky, and Ninstints: A World Heritage Site.

    Dr. MacDonald is Director Emeritus of the Bill Reid Foundation, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and holds an LL.D. from the University of Calgary. He was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in July 2006.

    Price:
    Student special: $6 per lecture or $18 for all 3 (valid id required)
    Members: $8 per lecture or $20 for all 3
    Non-members: $10 per lecture or $25 for all 3

    Wednesday, November 5: The Southern Villages
    SGang Gwaay, Tanu, Cumshewa, Skedans, Xaina, Chaatl, Kaisun and Skidegate

    Wednesday, November 12: The Central Villages
    Kayang, Kung, Hiellen, Kiusta, Yaku, Dadens, Tian and Masset.

    Wednesday, November 19: The Northern Villages
    Kasaan, Klinkwan, Suukwan, Koninglas, Howkan.
     
    By Jerry Grey, Visual Artist
    BILL REID: "Mythic Messengers" 1984
    Illustration by Jerry Grey

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